Jump to content

zzyzx

Members
  • Posts

    41
  • Joined

  • Days Won

    1

zzyzx last won the day on April 12

zzyzx had the most liked content!

1 Follower

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

zzyzx's Achievements

Explorer

Explorer (4/14)

  • One Month Later
  • Week One Done
  • Dedicated
  • Collaborator
  • Reacting Well

Recent Badges

27

Reputation

  1. I've had a urologist claim all men would have prostate cancer if they lived long enough..... However most men won't die from that.
  2. Ah, part of the reason I went with cloth diapers a long time ago. Add layers to handle the needed capacity to get a good nights sleep.... Yes, it is only recently I'm able to consider disposable diapers for night time use - and yes, that is due to the ABDL community for both the diapers and higher capacity stuffers (sp?).... I look for items that are functional in dealing with my issues and open to considering non-conventional sources....
  3. Not really worried / care about diaper sounds, but there again, I'm normally wearing cloth. I have recognized the sound of pee hitting the protective pants.... When I wet overnight (most of the time), I usually don't "finish" the mictrition cycle (i.e. voluntary controls are still in the relaxed state), so after waking up I can get a strong urge and start automatically re-leaving the bladder. And sometimes the first thing I notice is the sound of the strong stream flowing through the already wet diaper and hitting the plastic / vinyl / PUL / (or) rubber pants. So, yes, in a quiet enough room it might be noticed, but I think most folks wouldn't put 2 and 2 together and figure out what the sound was....
  4. The old Comco and VI Product's vinyl pants were cut to handle cloth diapers. I find most of the Gary pants not as good a cut.....
  5. @Incont / Mikey: <semi-joking suggestion coming> Time to switch to cloth (reusable) diapers?
  6. My usage started off dealing with secondary nocturnal enuresis, so started with wearing at night. Now due to bladder issues related to BPH, I also need some level of protection during the day, and mostly use the toilet during the day.... I won't claim to be "totally open" about this, and don't go around telling just to tell.... Parents (when they were alive) and siblings know, and a few others have been told how I deal with my issues. In general most folks, if they notice, won't say a thing. So, it typically doesn't come up. Otherwise, it is disclose as needed. The only time I've had someone comment on my diapers was while folding them (I wear cloth) after washing and drying them at a camp laundry while on vacation. A lady came in while I was folding, and commented that they would make good towels. I agreed they could, and then it dawned on her what they were, and that ended the conversation.
  7. I buy online.
  8. First, I normally use cloth diapers... But when it comes to disposables, I need something that can take a flood (at night, or possibly napping, or maybe miss-timing on a trip / vacation) and can be slipped on and off during the day when I'm mostly dry.... So the elastic waste band comes in handy for that. And as to too strong a tap, well, mega-max gets interesting to try to use in the day as it is "fun" to try to untape that to use the restroom... Agree that I don't need a wetness indicator. Leak guards (for # 1) are needed to avoid leaks....
  9. @John Davis I've only had one negative reaction out of a doctor, and I wasn't wearing diapers at the time, instead asking for a prescription prior to ordering replacement (cloth) diapers for dealing with the occasional nocturnal enuresis at that time. Now, I've added on issues from early on set BPH, so, both my primary care and urologist have seen me in my cloth diapers (and protective pants), and generally no issue... Last urology appointment included a cystoscopy, and the urologist told me to leave my "shorts" on (while waiting for the procedure) instead of saying diapers....
  10. @Brian This is only my opinion. I have had two UGI procedures years ago and one LGI procedure more recently. For the LGI, yes, the prep is "interesting". I understand there are at least two styles of prep used to clear the colon. I can understand why you might want to use the hospital for the prep work. In my opinion that is the worst part of getting the procedure. I find typically, the doctors will use an IV delivered knock out drug for the procedure so you are "out of it" while they run the scope, and won't remember what goes on. With this medication you definitely need someone assisting you after the procedure to get home. If you normally drive, you need to not do that I think for about 12 hours after the procedure. You might be able to handle your normal assisted transit (for wheel chair transportation) on your own. I'd discuss that with your doctor / medical team to get their opinion on that. One of my sisters has done the LGI procure without that knockout drug without issues. With my lack of feeling pain (typically till you find the nerve and actually hit it), I probably could have gotten away without using the knockout medication. So, yes, in my opinion, the prep is worse then the actual procedure. For me, I had the oral stuff in a set of consumption in the evening with the colonoscopy the next morning. There was one occurance where I should have been closer to the toilet than I was. The rest of the times, I was better handling. My memory recalls drinking the solution in two rounds, I forget how far apart. By the end you are cleaned out, and will have no food from a certain time prior through finishing the procedure. Once cleaned out, I would expect you will only use your diaper for # 1.... As to diapers, number would depend on how you manage the prep. I will admit that you may want to bring more than you think you will need. The clean out can hit with sudden need to get to the toilet, and I can see where that would be a challenge for you. You will not be in a diaper while they scope. You'll have to ask them about how they want to handle urine in that situation. For me it wasn't an issue. I did relieve the bladder after arriving the procedure, and had no issues through getting dressed again to go home, despite having issues with (at the time occasional) nocturnal enuresis.
  11. Yes.Usually about once a year to get a prescription for various needed supplies, so that if I ever get questioned on FSA or other expenditures I have an actual written prescription showing need.However, not too much beyond that. Prostate check and general discussion on incontinence gets deferred to the Urology appointments.... First time was when the acute onset of secondary nocturnal enuresis hit when I started a set of medication to knock out a sinus infection. After hearing that I had (only a few) incidences of bed-wetting as a child, he figured it would "go away on its own" after the treatment for the infection was done. I couldn't get across that I felt something had changed.... As I kid, it only rarely happened, max once a night, and not on consecutive nights. Long store short, once I was off the medications, I figured out how I "sensed" things had shifted for the second time as an adult, and this time it changed occasional nocturia into occasional secondary nocturnal enuresis... Doctors still don't have a good set of tests for checking how a person senses pain, smell, touch, etc. I've known since elementary school that how I sense things (starting with pain) was different from "normal". I did get a urinalysis out of it (showing no UTI, etc.) and if my memory serves right, a short prescription for oxybutin which didn't help, and if wanted, a referral to a urologist. I ended up spending some time at the local university medical library on weekends (when parking was free) researching the available research on incontinence / enuresis at the time and really only found studies of (a) women with what I considered small bladders (8 oz holding) and (b) children (mainly boys) that still had issues with enuresis and the success / failure rate to overcome that. A later primary care physician balked when I wanted a prescription for diapers for the bed-wetting (prior to planning to use FSA funds). He went off the deep end on the fetish side. Needless to say I found another primary care doctor. Due to current insurance, currently have two primary care doctors (and need to transition to a third before retiring). One comes at no cost to use, the other was my primary care prior to the current employer opting in to a plan that has the zero cost primary doctor visits at a specific clinic. The older one has no problem with my discussing prescription needs, and that has included disposable diapers not originally designed for medical.... but do work better for me when cloth isn't the best option.... Reminds me its about time for my approximately annual discussion again...
  12. Caught an auto correct error. Last medication line should read: The fourth option I'm aware of is the anti-diuretic hormone, which would probably help me, but I don't expect it would resolve my bed-wetting issue based on my current maximum functional bladder capacity.
  13. Medications: The general class of medications used for bladder issues, which Oxibutin (sp?) is one of, have negative impact on my brain function... (Negatively impacts playing Sudoku, and my work). OK, there are several medications that are variations in this class of medication. Mybetric (sp?) was the first in a new class of drugs (the only drug in its class the last I checked) and I was on it a year, where I think it helped me retrain to regain some of my lost bladder capacity after having the Resume procedure. I had a 90 trial supply followed by a 1 year prescription. Before I got the last refill, my (employer's) medical plan dropped it from the list and significantly upped the cost if it had been covered at all. So, I dropped the last 3 months (90 days) of the planned test. While I tolerated the drug fine, to me it wasn't worth over $1K for a 90 day supply, and other then probably helping me get back some of my previous functional capacity, it wasn't solving any of my other bladder issues. My urologist has mentioned there is now a third category of drugs (containing one drug last I checked), I haven't investigated this option, and believe it would also cost similar to Mybetric if I would try to get it. The fourth option I'm aware of is the anti-diuretic hormone, which partially help me, but I don't expect it would resolve my bed-wetting issue based on my current maximum functional bladder capacity. I believe that covers the four classes of medications used for incontinence issues. As to my incontinence: Started with occasional secondary nocturnal enuresis, with a oversized (from most Urologist perspective) bladder - where I would release about 24oz in the first release at night - when it hit (i.e. heavy bed-wetting). With early onset BPH, I picked up a light post mictriction drip and after watching and waiting a while I believe I have also picked up sometimes slight occasional leakage when I get the urge to go. With this I now have reduced maximum functional capacity (currently about 50% of what I used to have), and the occasional bed-wetting is now basically nightly. (Of the three items: (a) being properly hydrated, (b) getting a good nights sleep and (c) being dry in the morning, I can get at most two of these on any one night.)
  14. @Zombie_Turtle I have an older Tykables Jeans and also their "cargo" shorts. This is back when they were using snaps. I don't know if they switch out the snaps for Velcro and kept the same design, since I haven't picked up the new style at this point. The old pants are full length snaps from crotch to leg hem. And yes, they fully open up, but don't fully "come off" that way -- as the opening on these are on the inseam and not the outside seam of the pants. These are also aimed at the fetish market and unless you have long legs and get the short length, you will either need to fold up the bottom of the pants (like a kid wearing new pants that they'll grow into) or get them modified to fit your length if you intend to wear them normally. Another issue with their pants and shorts is they are cut low.... If you aren't wearing a romper or onsie with it, expect the top of your diaper to be exposed. So, I'd recommend only getting one to try at first to see if your OK with the cut. If it works for you, yes these are functional adaptive clothing, and cut to be worn over diapers (i.e. room for the diaper in the seat, etc.). I also have Tykables jean shortalls. I have actually worn those in warm weather on vacation. I find it convenient in that I don't have to drop my pants or shorts to the bath room floor while pulling down my diaper when I make it to the toilet. Or, if (when) I get worse, need to change a diaper while traveling. I usually can manage getting to restrooms during the day, but if there was a major delay on the road, I could see where I might need a diaper change at the next rest stop. And yes, this would be more convenient then having to take regular shorts or pants off to change a diaper.
  15. Tykables stock is interesting. At times, they are out. At other times, plenty. The delays between when they order and when they get supplies along with when certain sizes are out of stock is very notifiable (specifically in the clothing). Since their stuff in manufactured in China, there is a significant delay in them receiving product after ordering.... This is why for certain clothing (white t-shirt (onsies) and white rompers) I'll stock up in advance when they are in stock. This is also why I have some ABU white onesies (t-shirts) because Tykables was out of stock longer than I expected..... I would say, this is typical of Tykables.... While I mostly like Tykables (clothing) quality, some times what is in stock is more for the ABDL market than overlapping with the incontinent market. And sometimes, they are even more out of stock.
×
×
  • Create New...